What Does a Literary Agent Want to See When They Google You

July 31, 2013 By Chuck Sambuchino 267 Comments
What does a literary agent want to see when they google you?
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GIVEAWAY: Chuck is generously giving away a copy of his latest writing book, Create Your Writer Platform to a random commenter. Comment within one week to enter! (Must live in US or Canada to win.) Good luck! (UPDATE: DeiDei Boltz won.)

If you attract an agent’s interest and they want to know more, Google is their next step. An agent typically investigates a client before offering them representation, understandably. If you’re pitching nonfiction and touting a writer platform to help sell books, then a Google peek becomes even more important.

But don’t take my word for it. I asked agents themselves how they use Google, and what they’re looking for when they do. Here are their responses: Continue reading

Logline: Why They’re So Darn Important

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You’ve just finished writing your script and a friend puts you in touch with a film producer looking for her next project. During your conversation with the producer she asks you,

“What’s the logline?”

Your insides melt because even though you may know what a logline is, you never bothered to create one after writing the script — and even more importantly before writing it. Has this happened to you? Well, it happened to me in a similar manner when I began as a screenwriter. Continue reading